Prepare for Bans! Dayton Shooter Used “ATF Loophole” and Scary “Accessories”

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Hebron KY, AR15 manufacturer Anderson Manufacturing is reeling after photographs of the weapon used by *name redacted* in the Dayton OH shooting show the company logo on the forged lower used with an AR Pistol Upper and a Razor Arm Brace as well as a High Capacity Drum.

When we spoke to Anderson reps they reported that traffic to there website was up thousands of percent and sales of 80% lowers were skyrocketing at the time of this writing.

Local News in Cincinatti WKRC reported:

Key section of weapon used in Dayton mass shooting manufactured in Tri-State

During a news conference on Sunday, Dayton’s Police Chief Richard Biehl showed for the first time the weapon that *name redacted* used during his deadly rampage.

In the photo, a clear stamp at the center of the gun reads that the section is an AM-15 made by Anderson Manufacturing in Hebron, Kentucky.

Anderson Manufacturing operates a large facility near CVG Airport, where it makes and sells guns to licensed dealers and customers across the country.

WKRC reports further, co-owner of Anderson Manufacturing, Carl Anderson in the parking lot of the facility, who told me his company made only a portion of the gun that *name redacted* used.

“It’s just the lower receiver,” Anderson told me, describing the lower receiver as the key part of the body of the gun, where the ammunition magazine attaches.

But Anderson says his company didn’t make, nor assemble the rest of the gun *name redacted* used.

“We make whole guns, but that was sent out as a lower receiver,” Anderson told me, referring to the main section that was on full display in Dayton.

According to Anderson, the rest of the gun parts were assembled somewhere else.

“And then somebody made it in to a whole gun,” Anderson stated, adding, “The ATF is tracking all that down.

Anderson declined a formal interview, instead he handed me a piece of paper with the company’s statement, which reads:

Anderson manufacturing recently learned that a lower receiver manufactured by it in full compliance with its federal license was used in the senseless tragedy in dayton, oh. Anderson extends its deepest sympathy and condolences to all affected by this criminal act. Anderson has always, and continue to manufacture and sell to its licensed dealers and customers in accordance with all applicable laws, regulations and rules.”

Those points were emphasized by Mr. Anderson, himself.

“We follow all the rules,” he said.

Cincinnati.com reports:

Dayton shooter used a gun that may have exploited an ATF loophole

It is illegal to own a rifle with a barrel shorter than 16 inches without paying $200 for a National Firearms Act tax stamp and completing all the related paperwork and background checks. The process is similar to legally owning a fully-automatic rifle.

It is unclear if *name redacted* went through this process, but the firearm he used did have a barrel shorter than 16 inches.

AR-15 style firearms can be rifles or pistols. A pistol can have a short barrel, but no shoulder stock. A rifle can have a shoulder stock, but the barrel must be 16 inches or longer.

Enter the pistol brace, also known as a stabilizing brace. For all practical purposes, this device allows pistols with short barrels to have something resembling a shoulder stock

It is illegal to own a rifle with a barrel shorter than 16 inches without paying $200 for a National Firearms Act tax stamp and completing all the related paperwork and background checks. The process is similar to legally owning a fully-automatic rifle.

It is unclear if *name redacted* went through this process, but the firearm he used did have a barrel shorter than 16 inches.

AR-15 style firearms can be rifles or pistols. A pistol can have a short barrel, but no shoulder stock. A rifle can have a shoulder stock, but the barrel must be 16 inches or longer.

Enter the pistol brace, also known as a stabilizing brace. For all practical purposes, this device allows pistols with short barrels to have something resembling a shoulder stock

Even though it looked like a rifle, the gun used to kill nine people and wound at least 14 more was likely classified as a pistol, skirting around laws restricting short-barreled rifles.

Will the device on *name redacted* weapon, called a “pistol brace,” become the next bump stock in nation’s gun control debate?

Here’s what we know about the AR-15 style .223 caliber firearm used in the Dayton shooting Sunday:

  • It was legally purchased by *name redacted* from an online retailer in Texas. It then was transferred to him by a local firearms dealer who would be required to perform a background check, police said.
  • Nothing on *name redacted* criminal record would have prevented him from buying a gun.
  • He used legal-to-own 100-round drum magazines.
  • The lower receiver, which houses the trigger, was made by Anderson Manufacturing in Hebron, Kentucky. Under federal law, the lower receiver is the gun. Purchasing a lower receiver requires a background check. All other parts of guns, such as barrels and stocks, can be bought legally off the shelf or online.
  • Betts could have had as many as 250 rounds in his possession; he fired at least 41 rounds in about 30 seconds.

    On Monday, Dayton Police Chief Richard Biehl said *name redacted* gun was “modified in essence to function like a rifle” and “to avoid any legal prohibitions.” He did not specifically cite a pistol brace, but photos of the weapon released by police show one.

    The federal restrictions on short-barreled rifles were enacted to stop people from making rifles, guns fired from the shoulder, more concealable. Rifles typically can fire more powerful cartridges than pistols and shoulder stocks allow the rifles to be fired more accurately.

    It is illegal to own a rifle with a barrel shorter than 16 inches without paying $200 for a National Firearms Act tax stamp and completing all the related paperwork and background checks. The process is similar to legally owning a fully-automatic rifle.

    It is unclear if *name redacted* went through this process, but the firearm he used did have a barrel shorter than 16 inches.

    AR-15 style firearms can be rifles or pistols. A pistol can have a short barrel, but no shoulder stock. A rifle can have a shoulder stock, but the barrel must be 16 inches or longer.

    Enter the pistol brace, also known as a stabilizing brace. For all practical purposes, this device allows pistols with short barrels to have something resembling a shoulder stock

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